ROT System

Zorn

Newbie III
i dont think ROT should have such a heavy affect on crafting skills, considering you stand majorly in one spot. it really hinders growth in crafting community.
 

ArgentSmoke

Newbie III
Community Supporter
I wouldn't think ROT should come into play for ANY skills that use resources (ingots, boards, regs, cloth/leathers etc)
 

Dan

Staff Member
Administrator
Game Master
Moderator
Why?

ROT is ANY skill above 70. That is not changing.

 
OP
OP
Zorn

Zorn

Newbie III
cause its just not viable for skills that you literally stand in one place, or have crafting and resource skills ROT cut down massively. i already think that the ROT system heavily impacts the game where most people are going to leave before end game content comes out because its simply isnt 98 anymore. i understand having a delay system but to get from 70-80 is 16 HOURS of ingame time and people just generally dont have that time to play games anymore.
Post automatically merged:

i think i've had more fun from 0-70 then i've had from 70-74.
 

Dan

Staff Member
Administrator
Game Master
Moderator
Well the point is NOT to stand there.

The point is to log in and play, understanding you will ONLY get a small skill gain, for playing, right away. The point isn't to macro as you literally will only gain as much as the most casual of players. Once ever x hours.

Siege still uses this system on production. It never existed in 1998 and wasn't added until 2006.

Read the original post about ROT that I posted above.
 

ArgentSmoke

Newbie III
Community Supporter
This comes back to the ages old game design philosophy debates that have plagued online gaming since, well, UO first came out :) Don't get me wrong here, there's merits to both sides of the question, but I've always believed that the objective should never be to allow the causal player to compete with the dedicated player. That's an unrealistic design goal to achieve, and alienates the dedicated players. Dedicating more time and effort into your game (or any other endeavor) should yield greater rewards than someone who put less effort in.

On the other hand, in most games with large player bases, the casual players make up the largest portion of the player base, so you don't want to alienate them. Game design which heavily favors dedicated players creates "barriers to entry" for new or casual players and will ensure you have a small player base.

I've always believed the answer was not to allow the casual player to be competitive with the dedicated players but to protect the casual players FROM the dedicated players. In any game which allows unrestricted PvP you'll have that subset of players who will feel some sense of accomplishment from preying on other players who are newer, weaker, or focused on different goals (Anyone remember having their miner whacked by a wannabe PK who crowed about it as tho it was a huge accomplishment?)

Levelling the playing field is an easier answer but it will always happen at the expense of one or another playstyle. I've always believed the true solution is to separate the playing fields and eliminate the potential for griefing. This is a much more difficult proposition though and I've yet to see a "perfect" solution.
 
Top